Book, screen, stage, festival & event reviews

Music and Some Highly Musical People by James M. Trotter

Book Name:
Music and Some Highly Musical People
Book info:
Music and Some Highly Musical People Music and Some Highly Musical People James M. Trotter by James M. Trotter
Book Size:
101,247 / 308 pg
Mnybks.net:
23420
Publisher:
gutenberg.org
Date of Addition:
1881
Copyright Date:
1881
Copyrighted By:
James M. Trotter from gutenberg.org
Adult content:
No
Language:
English
Categories:
Music, African-American Studies
Grade Levels:
ML
Submitted By:
Admin
NIMAC:
Music and Some Highly Musical People Music and Some Highly Musical People James M. Trotter by James M. Trotter is a free eBook downloads for your Kindle, iPad/iPhone, computer, smart phone or ereader.

Reviews of Music and Some Highly Musical People (14 reviews)

4 - No Rating Yet

Music and Some Highly Musical People by James M. Trotter description:

Containing brief chapters on: A Description of Music, the Music of Nature, a Glance at the History of Music, the Power, Beauty, and Uses of Music. Following which are given sketches of the lives of remarkable musicians of the colored race. With portraits, and an appendix containing copies of music composed by colored men.

man must, of course, be attributed the present developments, and the beautiful, diversified forms, existing in musical art. But, before man was, the great Author of harmony had created what may be called the music of Nature.

Afterwards, the human ear, penetrated by sounds of melody issuing from wind, wave, or bird, the rapt mind in strange and pleasing wonder contemplating the new and charming harmonies,–then it was that man received his first impressions, and took his first lessons in delightful symphony.

Take from man all creative and performing power in music, leaving him only the ear to catch and the mind to comprehend the sounds, and there would still be left to him God's own music,–the music of Nature, which, springing as it did from eternity, shall last throughout eternity.

Passing what must appear to human comprehension as vague (an attempt at the contemplation of which would be without profit in this connection), and what has been called the "music of the spheres,"[3] we may pr



Comments are closed.